What Can A Beloved Christmas Classic Teach Us About Life?

As everyone is celebrating Christmas liturgically, I manage to do something that others have already done and that is to watch “It’s a Wonderful Life”. This may offend my mom since she was never fond of the movie, but that is okay.

Now, in its 75th year, the movie has time and time again made a central point about the message of life.

“Strange, isn’t it? Each man’s life touches so many other lives. When he isn’t around he leaves an awful hole, doesn’t he?” Clarence

In the movie, George Bailey hits a breaking point asking that he was never been born. When an angel named Clarence comes to intervene, Geroge discovers what life is when he is not around. As George watches all of the things he accomplished during his life, he sees the dark and tragic alternative when he never existed. One pivotal moment is the dream home him and his wife would live in and grow a life together as he revisits that same house that is deserted and abandoned. Another is the gravesite of his brother Harry who in his reality won the Medal of Honor for saving countless lives in the Pacific Theater of Wolrd wear II. Geroge saved his brother from drowning when they were boys.

Clarence ensures George that he has lived a wonderful life and that he must continue to live it despite his failures.

“Remember, George: no man is a failure who has friends.” Clarence

In the end, life is worth living and there is so much it can teach us. Never take it for granted.

While the film flopped during its initial release in 1946, the movie still has pivotal moment that all life is precious.

In the end, Clarence delivers a hand-written message to George after being sparred from a suicide attempt to