Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf Vetoes Bill That Would Save Babies From Abortion

Wolf is extremely close to the abortion chain Planned Parenthood, having once been a volunteer. It spent a record $1.5 million to support his re-election in 2018.

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Micaiah Bilger of Life News reported on PA Governor Tom Wolf’s veto of Bill 857.  The bill would expand telemedicine to PA residents during the COVID crisis, but would not include abortion drugs

Pennsylvania pro-life leaders criticized Gov. Tom Wolf on Thursday for doing the bidding of the abortion industry by vetoing a health care expansion bill because it included a restriction on drug-induced abortions.

“This veto sends the disturbing message that women’s health will be compromised in order to placate the abortion industry,” said Maria Gallagher, legislative director of the Pennsylvania Pro-Life Federation.

Gallagher said Senate Bill 857 included important protections for mothers and unborn babies. The legislation would have expanded telemedicine to millions of Pennsylvanians in response to the coronavirus crisis. It included restrictions on telemedicine for high-risk drugs on the Food and Drug Administration Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy list, and abortion drugs are on the list.

Because of the restriction, Wolf promised his pro-abortion allies that he would veto the legislation, and, on Thursday, he did.

Michael Geer, president of the Pennsylvania Family Institute, said Wolf is putting abortion politics ahead of Pennsylvanians’ well-being.

“When Planned Parenthood wants a veto, Governor Tom Wolf gives it to them every time – no matter the impact on the health and well-being of Pennsylvania citizens,” Geer said.

Geer said Wolf not only rejected the health care expansion, he also showed his willingness to put women at risk by ignoring FDA safety guidelines for abortion drugs.

The abortion drug mifepristone is not safe for the mother or her unborn child. It has been linked to at least 24 women’s deaths and 4,000 serious complications. Risks of mifepristone and misoprostol, the most common abortion drugs taken together to abort and then expel an unborn baby from the womb, include excessive bleeding, severe abdominal pain, infection, hemorrhage and death.

A 2009 study  “Immediate Complications After Medical Compared With Surgical Termination of Pregnancy.” Obstetrics and Gynecology found a complication rate of approximately 20% for the abortion drugs compared to 5.6% for surgical abortions. Hemorrhages and incomplete abortions were among the most common complications.

Despite these risks, the abortion industry is pushing to expand telemed abortions. Instead of seeing a doctor in-person, women meet remotely over a webcam before the abortion drugs are dispensed from a remote-control drawer or by a staff member.

These are dangerous for mothers as well as their unborn babies. In-person exams are important for dating the pregnancy; the abortion drugs do not work well later in pregnancy and potentially could lead to more complications. Exams also can detect ectopic pregnancies, which can be deadly on their own but especially so if the woman takes the abortion drugs.

Currently, 18 states ban telemed abortions and require abortion facilities to follow FDA guidelines.

 Life News article continues here

ACTION ALERT: Contact Gov. Tom Wolf

Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf Vetoes Bill Banning Down Syndrome Abortions

Wolf has close ties to the abortion industry.  In 2018, his re-election campaign received a record $1.5 million in support from Planned Parenthood. 

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Gov. Tom Wolf is rabidly pro-abortion.  He served as a volunteer escort at Planned Parenthood.  During his 2018 reelection campaign, the Philadelphia Inquirer reported that Planned Parenthood described him as a “bulwark against GOP-led attempts in Harrisburg to restrict abortion rights” and as the “last line of defense.”

Below is a Life News report by Steven Ertelt and Miciah Bilger on Gov. Wolf’s latest veto on a bill that would have protected Down Syndrome unborn babies from abortion.  

Pennsylvania Democrat Gov. Tom Wolf on Wednesday vetoed a bill to protect unborn babies with Down syndrome from discrimination.

The Down Syndrome Protection Act (House Bill 321) passed the state Senate on Wednesday in a 27-22 vote. The bill would prohibit an abortion solely based on a diagnosis of Down syndrome. It would add to a state law that also prohibits discriminatory sex-selection abortions. The Pennsylvania House previously passed the measure by an overwhelming, bipartisan margin.

But Wolf today vetoed the legislation to protect babies with Down syndrome.

In a statement, the governor called the legislation a “restriction on women and medical professionals and interferes with women’s health care and the crucial decision-making between patients and their physicians.” He said enforcement of the bill would “upend the doctor-patient relationship and impede on patient confidentiality.”

“Gov. Wolf’s veto will prevent all children with Down’s Syndrome from going on to live happy and fulfilled lives,” said Eric Failing, executive director of the Pennsylvania Catholic Conference.

“Had Gov. Wolf signed this legislation, he would’ve ensured the protection of humanity’s most vulnerable lives. We thank all legislators who came together in a bi-partisan fashion to support this common-sense legislation, and PCC looks forward to working with them again to protect the sanctity of life.”

Ahead of his veto, Wolf slammed the bill in a statement to the AP, claiming it “seeks to limit health care choices for women and politicize difficult moments for vulnerable families.”

“This bill masks yet another attempt to ban abortions and put politicians between a woman and her doctor,” Wolf’s office said.

Wolf has close ties to the abortion industry. He once volunteered as an escort at a Planned Parenthood abortion facility. In 2018, his re-election campaign received a record $1.5 million in support from Planned Parenthood. He also appointed several people from the abortion chain to his administration, including his chief of staff. It is not clear if there are enough votes in the state legislature to override Wolf’s veto.

“We have a responsibility to protect those who don’t have a voice,” said state Rep. Kate Klunk, R-York County, a sponsor of the bill, in a statement earlier this year. “We have a responsibility to stand up against eugenics. And, we have a responsibility to stand up to say that a baby with Down syndrome has a right to life and should not be discriminated against in the womb.”

Other sponsors include Sen. Scott Martin, R-Lancaster and House Speaker Mike Turzai, R-Allegheny County. A number of disability rights advocates also support the bill, including Karen Gaffney, a long-distance swimmer with Down syndrome and disability rights advocate, Kurt and Chloe Kondrich, and Sara Hart Weir, the former president of the National Down Syndrome Society.

Supporters urged lawmakers to protect unborn babies from discrimination, noting how abortion has become a modern means of eugenics.

Life News article continues here

ACTION:  Contact Gov. Tom Wolf here to complain about him vetoing the Down Syndrome bill.