Indiana Bill Would Allow for Voluntary Euthanasia of Terminally Ill

Patients must be at least 18 years old and Indiana residents to request medical aid in dying. 

hospitalpatient

TV station WTHR in Indianapolis reported on House Bill 1020 that would legalize euthanasia for patients 18 years or older. This is exactly the slippery slope that pro-life supporters said would be the result of the Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision in 1973.  They foresaw the obvous truth that if a baby isn’t safe within the shelter of its mother’s womb, then no one is safe. See article below and the link to read the bill.  Tetty Noble

A newly introduced Indiana bill would allow people with terminal illnesses to request medication that would end their own lives.

Democratic Rep. Matt Pierce submitted the bill Tuesday.

The bill describes terminal illness as an “incurable and irreversible illness that will, within reasonable medical judgment, result in death within six months.”

Patients must be at least 18 years old and Indiana residents to request medical aid in dying. The request must be written and cannot be accepted unless the patient is of “sound mind.”

If a patient makes a request, there will first be a 15-day waiting period, then doctors are required to confirm the request with the patient. Medication is self-administered. If the patient does take the medication, an insurance company would not be allowed to deny payment of benefits based on a suicide clause.

To read the entire bill, here.

If the bill passes, it would go into effect July 1, 2020.

 

‘We Never Thought Twice’: Teacher Adopts Student With Down Syndrome After Mom Dies

 

Caucasian mother holding baby girl with Down Syndrome

The following is an inspiring story by Will Maule of Faithwire.  He writes about the selfless love of a teacher, a terminally mother and her son.

A compassionate teacher has adopted her own student after his mom died of cancer.

The incredible story began four years ago with a brutally honest conversation between special-ed teacher Kerry Bremer and Jean Manning, a terminally ill mother.

Though the pair had only known each other for a matter of months, their conversation would prove to be life-altering both for Kerry and for Manning’s son, Jake, who has Down Syndrome.

“I said, ‘I may be overstepping here and forgive me if I am, but my family and I would like to offer guardianship for Jake if you need a backup plan,’” Bremer recalled to TODAY Parents.

Through tears, Jean accepted her offer.

“I’ll sleep better tonight than I have in a very long time,’” the ailing mother explained.

Bremer noted how she “fell in love with Jake instantly” and could not help but offer him a place in their family. “I knew he would a need a home and there was no way I wouldn’t open ours to him,” she said.

Kerry Petkewich Bremer about a week ago

This past Wednesday, Jeanie Manning became a “Queen Angel.” She fought a long, hard and often very unfair battle with cancer. We knew it would happen some day, but it was the last thing any of us expected this past Wednesday. As a result of her passing, we will love, protect and treasure Jake just as we promised. He will live with us forever and we will keep her memory, her love, her determination and her beautiful smile alive in his heart and ours every day! We love you “Queen Angel Mom.” Fly high and watch over us every day. “Our boy” will miss you terribly, but we’ve got this! ❤️🙏😇 “Bremer, party of 6

On November 13, Manning passed away,

“My mom went to heaven,” Jake told CBS 17. “She’s my queen, angel mom. She’s always in my heart..she loved me so much.”

After Jean passed, Jean honored her promise and Jake moved into the family home. The house was already filled with Jake’s toys and clothes from the countless hours he’d been spending there while his mom went through grueling treatment. The transition was tough but is going well so far.

“We never thought twice about it,” Manning said of their decision to welcome Jake into their family. “I loved this kid so much. He has done more for us than we could ever do for him.”

Website: Faithwire